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  • Wen Capital Advisory Group

Women and Financial Strategies

Updated: Jan 25



Women who share money management duties with their partner tend to take on a lion’s share of the responsibility for the household finances. Yet only 18% of women feel very confident in their ability to fully retire with a comfortable lifestyle.1,2


Although more women are providing for their families, when it comes to preparing for retirement, they may be leaving their future to chance.


Women and College

The reason behind this disparity doesn't seem to be a lack of education or independence. Today, women are more likely to go to college and graduate than men. So what keeps them from taking charge of their long-term financial picture?3


One reason may be a lack of confidence. One study found that only 55% of women feel confident in their ability to manage their finances. Women may shy away from discussing money because they don’t want to appear uneducated or naive and hesitate to ask questions as a result.4


Insider Language

Since Wall Street traditionally has been a male-dominated field, women whose expertise lies in other areas may feel uneasy amidst complex calculations and long-term financial projections. Just the jargon of personal finance can be intimidating: 401(k), 403(b), fixed, variable. To someone inexperienced in the field of personal finance, it may seem like an entirely different language.5


But women need to keep one eye looking toward retirement since they may live longer and could potentially face higher healthcare expenses than men. If you have left your long-term financial strategy to chance, now is the time to pick up the reins and retake control. Consider talking with a financial professional about your goals and ambitions for retirement. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification if the conversation turns to something unfamiliar. No one was born knowing the ins and outs of compound interest, but it’s important to understand in order to make informed decisions.


Compound Interest: What’s the Hype?

Compound interest may be one of the greatest secrets of smart investing. And time is the key to making the most of it. If you invested $250,000 in an account earning 6%, at the end of 20 years your account would be worth $801,784.


However, if you waited 10 years, then started your investment program, you would end up with only $447,712.

Citations:

1. HerMoney.com, April 12, 2022

2. TransAmericaCenter.org, 2021 3. Brookings.edu, October 8, 2021 4. CNBC.com, June 8, 2022 5. Distributions from 401(k), 403(b), and most other employer-sponsored retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. Generally, once you reach age 73, you must begin taking required minimum distributions.


This material does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

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